Teaching physics: The most important work that I have ever done

Despite some of the challenges, teaching physics feels like the most important work that I have ever done. On those occasions when students are engaged with a topic and asking interesting questions, it is possible to feel that you might be making a difference.

Immediately before starting training, I was working as a TA within science, having studied for a degree with the Open University. Before this, I had worked in music retail, an insurance office, and had studied guitar building.

 

“The opportunity to help students with their understanding of the physical world and with the mathematical literacy is immensely rewarding”

An acoustics module as part of my guitar building course rekindled my interest in physics and mathematics and, returning to education later in life; I became fascinated by the way people learn these subjects. I decided to train to teach physics because I enjoy the challenge of helping students to appreciate fundamental rules of the universe and how physics connects with their everyday experiences.

Teacher training is hard but the opportunity to help students with their understanding of the physical world and with the mathematical literacy is immensely rewarding.

I feel that the support of the IOP has been invaluable. It is fantastic to be able to meet with other subject specialists and share teaching ideas. The scholarship masterclasses are brilliant and provide an excellent opportunity for a brief escape from some of the more generic aspects of teacher training and to spend time focusing just on physics. I have already incorporated ideas from the masterclasses into my teaching. Being able to share what I have learned with my department in school has enhanced my confidence and helped me meet some of the professional standards expected of a teacher.

  • The Institute of Physics is awarding Teacher Training Scholarships to individuals who have impressive subject knowledge, a passion to share their subject and the determination to become an exceptional teacher of physics. IOP scholars will benefit from £28,000 tax-free funding, as well as a package of support that includes CPD, networking events and IOP membership. Find out more and apply.

Robert Pomeroy

Robert is a Trainee Physics Teacher and IOP Scholar.

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